Clothes – laundry — the simple, easy way!

One of the most significant decisions in minimizing to an RV lifestyle is the subject of clothing.  We all have closets and drawers full of clothes! A big part of downsizing was going through the clothes and deciding what to keep, recognizing that storage was minimal and the difference my new lifestyle would require in clothing. I took my clues from Marie Kondo’s book, The Art of Tidying Up.  I cleared a big area of the living room, and piled ALL the clothes from every closet and dresser and shelf and basket in the house.  Then I ruthlessly went through the mountain of stuff, throwing each item into the three SAVE – GIVE – TRASH piles. Since I would no longer be working in an office, all the work clothes went into the GIVE pile. Then I immediately bagged the GIVE and TRASH piles into garbage bags – white kitchen bags for GIVE to go to donation and black garbage bags for TRASH (underwear, socks, old holey sweats and T shirts, etc.)

With a much smaller pile of clothing to KEEP, I then decided to select 8 outfits for warmer weather and 8 outfits for colder weather.  I chose my favorite clothes and put them together into piles of tops and bottoms – and found that most were of the black/white/aqua coloring.  The rest I put into more white garbage bags to give away. I made a pile of 10 sets of underwear and socks, a swimsuit, one casual dress, a hoodie, a winter coat, two pajamas, and set them aside. Then I took all the garbage bags out to the car, drove to the donation center to toss in all the white bags, and to the dumpster to toss in all the black bags.  DONE! One ruthless afternoon, and no more dithering back and forth about clothes!

FYI – At the same time, I did the same thing with shoes – keeping a pair each of slippers, sneakers, hiking shoes, sandals, flip flops, and casual black shoes. All the rest went to GIVE or TRASH, depending on their condition. The shoes are in an inexpensive 12-pair hanging shoe bag , hanging over the back of the headboard and behind the bed. Used dryer sheets get tucked into the shoes so the van doesn’t smell like a locker room. (I prefer the lavender dryer sheets!)

Now I have been on the road for over a year, and am happy with the clothing choices I made. Most of the outfits coordinate and I have easily transitioned from warm weather to cooler weather to warm weather again. The layers work for me, and I have been very comfortable.  If I buy something, I donate the old so I am not adding more stuff into my van.     8 outfits for each season works well.

I do not have laundry facilities in my van by choice. I keep a small laundry basket handy and toss my dirty clothes there until it is full. Then I find a laundromat or use a family/friend washer when visiting.  I actually prefer to use a public laundromat or campground laundromat so I am not imposing on others.  Here is a picture of my laundry basket, which has detergent pods, dryer sheets, and a coin purse of quarters at the bottom, ready for the next laundry day.

The laundry basket – ready for the next washday

After I have washed and dried my clothes, I set them up as outfits.  I place a pair of capris/leggings down first on the table. Then I select a top folded lengthwise and underwear, and roll them together with the underwear inside.  Then this small bundle gets rolled up into the pants in a tight bundle.  Rolling prevents wrinkles and keeps the outfit tightly together.  I vary which tops and bottoms to combine so I don’t get bored with the clothing choices.

Capris, summer top, and underwear – outfit ready to be rolled up tightly
Top and underwear rolled into a small bundle, then rolled into pants

I use fabric cubes to store my clothes. One cube will have warm weather clothes (usually capris and a summery top with underwear) and another cube will have cooler weather clothes (usually leggings and a tunic and underwear). Then I just pull the next roll out of the appropriate cube for the weather that day and get dressed.  The rolled clothing bundles also make it easy to pack my gym bag if I am showering at a Planet Fitness or a campground or friend/family shower (Really? You never got into the shower room to find that you left your clean underwear in the van, or worse yet  — dropped it in the parking lot?!?!?) The fabric cubes are between the bed and back doors, and easily accessible from either inside reaching over the bed or outside via the back door.

Warm weather cube with outfits rolled into individual bundles
Cooler weather cube – outfits rolled into individual bundles

If I were a young mom raising kids again, I would definitely do this for the children in the family, even living in a home and not on the road.  Roll together a day’s outfit including underwear and socks, and it is so much easier to get them dressed for the day! And clean underwear gets used every day! (Seriously? your kids didn’t wear the same underwear for several days until you noticed?!?!?) The kid picks a bundle and puts it on – no more “which shirt do you want to wear? are those matching socks? no, please don’t choose an orange plaid shirt and purple striped shorts” arguments in the morning!

This is also a great technique for vacations, camping, etc.  You get the correct number of outfits and don’t end up with seven shirts and 3 pants and one pair of underwear. Keep a travel bag with toothbrush, toothpaste, shampoo and shower gel, and you are good to go!  It takes me about 10 minutes to pack for a trip – even going 2 weeks to South Korea to visit my daughter.

When I load the fabric cubes according to weather, it makes the morning choices easier – no more hunting for longer pants or a cooler shirt! I know which cube has warm weather clothes and which cube has cooler weather clothes.  There is another cube with extra underwear, the pajamas, and socks. One more cube has the swimsuit, hoodie, dress, etc. Everything is rolled to prevent wrinkles, even the casual dress! The laundry basket goes back into the van, making sure there are more detergent pods, dryer sheets, and quarters for the next laundry day – if not, I stop and purchase those things right away before the first dirty clothes get added on top.  This way I know I am ready for the next laundromat visit – no hunting for quarters or having to buy detergent from an expensive vending machine!

Ready for the next washday with detergent pods, dryer sheets, and quarters in a coin purse

It takes one washer to clean the laundry basket-ful, and another washer for sheets, towels, pillow cases – which I do once or twice a month depending on how often I slept in the van versus someone’s spare bedroom or my tent.  I spend very little time on clothing and am very comfortable with this setup for my particular lifestyle.

Everyone’s life is different, and your clothing preferences/lifestyle may differ, and so I humbly offer this as a starting point to thinking about how to simplify life.  

 

From my bookshelf:

“Very often we view God as a sort of grand puppeteer – making this one to jiggle and that one to dance, all on cue. I wonder, however, if this analogy isn’t all wrong. I wonder, instead, if it wouldn’t be better to analogize God as the master conductor instructing the various sections to respond on God’s signal – this section then the next, rhythmically responding and harmonizing with excellence. I wonder if God isn’t instead this great music maker, teaching all creation to play and sing along to the melody of love. God speaks: “Listen. Do you hear it? Do you know the tune? Join with me. Let us make music in the key of divine love!”

–Essay by Will Albright, The Jesus Lens: Seeing God through Jesus     from the book Uncontrolling Love: Essays Exploring the Love of God                     by Thomas Jay Oord, et al, 2017

 

 

 

 

Interrupting the big picture…happily!

One of the best perks of life on the road is the ability to stop at any time and lend a hand/be available to someone in need.  Whether it is your own family or an old friend or a complete stranger, there is nothing quite like the great feeling of being “in the right place at the right time” to make a difference for someone.

This month I began my four-month road trip as planned. Stayed a couple of days longer at one place to facilitate get-togethers with more family, added an extra night the next week to meet up with a niece I hadn’t seen in ma-a-a-a-a-a-ny years, and ended up arriving at my son’s house just as my daughter-in-law received a diagnosis of possible pre-eclampsia with the 7-month-in-utero twins.

What a great blessing to be able to extend a quick visit for over a week to help during the crisis. Fortunately, although the crisis quickly escalated, the twin boys were born naturally in the OR within days, and are doing fantastic in the NICU.  Carrie is able to stay at the Ronald McDonald House next door so she can focus on the twins.  The other five siblings are at home, being cared for by family and friends.  It was a privilege to be a part of the “village” that cared for my family.

I say this because many times when I was working the 9-5 from a sticks-and-bricks stationary home, I would hear of something happening and be unable to physically help. I am rethinking part of my future planning – to always allow for helping others. Now that I no longer need to keep to a rigid schedule, like so many who live on the road, should we not stop and help whenever possible? Isn’t this one of the best perks of our “go with the flow” schedule!?!?!

Also during the month of July, I was privileged to visit the beautiful land and people of Prince Edward Island, Canada. I thoroughly enjoyed all the Anne of Green Gables attractions, including a musical theatre production in Charlottetown one evening. As I happened to arrive on July 1, the birthday of Canada, I was able to walk into a harbor festival in Summerside for a wonderful evening of music, good food, and fireworks with some lovely people.  My little van parked in the public harbor parking gave me instant access, and I was able to stay there for the night – sleeping with a wonderful sea breeze coming in my windows.

The coast of Prince Edward Island has 37 lighthouses, 9 of which are open to climb and enjoy a magnificent view.  The red cliffs along the coast were my afternoon delights – a different beach/park each day as I wound my way around the island.  For any bikers, this is a biking paradise as bike trails wind around the entire coast – I enjoyed walking many of these trails.  Each hill I crested provided yet another spectacular view of waves, cliffs, beaches, lighthouses, and so much more.  The pink, purple and white lupin that grow along the roads are so pretty. Yet the entire island is sparsely touristed and never felt crowded.

When I arrived back in Maine, I was able to spend more time with my oldest brother than I have spent with him in years. It was a great time to reconnect and feel more like part of his family again! Another few days with another brother and his family, and I was so happy to help celebrate a favorite nephew’s 40th birthday.  Spending more time just chilling and visiting – instead of rushing to see each person on a quick visit – this is what is different with my current travels.  I spent some time with a friend from Long Island who summers at Point Sebago and met her family – the last time I saw her was when her first daughter was born and now the three girls are all adults!

An evening with two older cousins in Portland, Maine, made me very happy, and I learned more about my extended family than ever before. How sad that our previous generations allowed animosity and resentment to separate the family so that we did not get to know each other and spend time together while growing up.  Happily, we are changing that as adults!

The next day I went to visit one of my cousins at her camp on Sebago Lake, which I vaguely remember from the past, and it was my great pleasure to have an afternoon to visit with her and one of her sons. My “first cousin once removed” is an amazing inner city high school teacher and I am so proud of the work he is doing and the relationships he is investing himself in with young people. What a glowing example of a teacher who cares, really cares, about his students as individuals! It was wonderful to hear about what they are accomplishing in Nashville, and I loved connecting with him over the picnic table lakeside.

  My favorite cousin and her family was next on the list for a visit. While I have often stopped by for visits “on the way” somewhere, this was the first time in decades that I spent several days with her. Despite this, we have always maintained a connection that is more sister than cousin. I enjoyed spending time getting to know her family members a bit more. As I was leaving, she remarked how much more she would miss me now that we had actually spent some days together – exactly how I feel!  Slowing down to spend more time with a person makes such a stronger connection, and I am so glad I have these opportunities. Pulling my little camper van into a driveway for a few days means we spend so much more time together yet I can sleep in my van and not inconvenience anyone – although my wonderful “first cousin once removed”, Sam, was willing to give up his bed to make me more comfortable!!  Pretty cool for a 16-year-old young man to be willing to sacrifice his bed for me! His big sister, Deanna, was also wonderful to visit – they sure have grown up and are terrific adults.

By the way, Google informs me that the child of my cousin is NOT my second cousin, but is my first cousin once removed.  Google also says they should be addressed as niece and nephew – yay!  We usually just say “cousin” and leave it at that, but whatever the name, they are some pretty awesome people.  I was able to meet my “first cousin once removed” Stuart’s wife, and their four kids I have only known through Facebook.  Much as I love Facebook and social media to keep in touch with people, FACE TIME is so much better!!!

Now I am back in New York, spending time with my son Sean and his family, and making some smaller trips to visit friends and places in the area.  I am looking forward to the Norman Rockwell Museum in Stockbridge, Massachusetts, next week.  Two months of my four month trip are done, and it has been wonderful!  I have reconnected and met so many family/friends – I feel so blessed.

How have the finances been?  Here are the stats for the first two months:

JUNE (5 weeks, including last week of May):

Gas $470 – for 2786 miles; Food $130; Other $270 – TOTAL $870

JULY (includes trip to Canada)

Gas $433 – for 2638 miles; Food $183; Other $381 – TOTAL $997

August will be less expensive as I am based mainly in New York at my son’s home and just taking small trips.  Lots of time chillin’ with the fam! I am also working more online classes to replenish the funds as I did spend more on food and entertainment/touristy stuff than I had planned. I am fortunate to have a job that allows me to travel and plan my work around the more important things of life! In June I earned just about $525 and a little less in July as I did not work at all while in Canada, and much of the time in Maine.  When I leave New York, I will reduce my teaching schedule again to fit my travel schedule.  Since my phone/insurance bills are only $300 a month, I am in good shape.  With no other debts, I can enjoy this lifestyle by keeping it simple and doing a LOT of boondocking!

Where have I boondocked on this trip?  Besides the driveways of family and friends, I have overnighted in:  a harbor parking lot, a hospital visitor parking lot, on a town street beside a park, at Walmarts and Cracker Barrel restaurants, truck stops and secure 24-hour highway convenience/rest stops.  I have only paid $24 in campground fees, for 3 nights, and have otherwise boondocked for free.

Hope your summer is going well, and you are happily connecting with family and friends, too!  Life is too short to waste, and too beautiful to miss! While not everyone has the ability to travel like I am doing, have FUN and ENJOY each day!

Scout — out!!

From my bookshelf:

“It was not nature that moved me…it was the feeling of smallness, of isolation, that I craved. How I wish I felt at home in the crowds of Salem, the salons of Boston. Still, when I am in society, I feel their need and hopes on me like an actual physical presence….Company is a burden to those at home in the solitude of their souls.”

The House of Hawthorne, by Erica Robuck, 2015